New York Mafia Social Clubs Past and Present

Wimpy Boys Club

WIMPY BOYS SOCIAL CLUB — 7506 13th Ave., Brooklyn.

For years this was Colombo capo Greg Scarpa Sr. home away from home. At one point, one of Scarpa’s crew murdered a young woman they feared would turn informant. The woman was shot in the head, rolled up in a rug and disposed of elsewhere. Days later a dog running around the club walked up with the woman’s ear in its mouth. Today the club is Sal’s Hairstylist and Barber Shop. On a back wall is a black-and-white artist’s rendering of the Dapper Don John Gotti sitting beside Marlon Brando’s Vito Corleone. There are also headshots of Al Pacino as ‘Scarface’ and other celebs. City records show the property has been owned by Salvatore Pellegrino since the 1970s. ‘He’s away,’ a worker said Thursday when asked if Pellegrino was available. (Pictured: Carmine Sessa outside in black jacket)

 

Triangle Civic

TRIANGLE CIVIC IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION — 208 Sullivan St., Manhattan

Once a meeting place for Genovese boss Vincent (Chin) Gigante, who lived nearby with his mother and performed a decade-long crazy act roaming the streets of Greenwich Village in robe and slippers. Gigante is shown in photo in a more lucid state outside the club. Today the club is shuttered and padlocked, painted black over graffiti. A tenant of the building said it’s been empty for years: ‘I never see it open.’ (Pictured: Vincent ‘Chin’ Gigante outside the club in the early ’80s.)

 

Palma Social Club

PALMA BOYS SOCIAL CLUB — 416 E. 115th St., Manhattan.

Once this served as the hangout of Anthony ‘Fat Tony’ Salerno, the pretend boss the Genovese family put up to cover for Chin Gigante. Here was the mob’s corner outpost in what was once an Italian neighborhood and is now primarily Hispanic. The FBI bugged the place for 18 months in the mid-1980s, using Fat Tony’s recorded words against him. Most recently the club was a boutique with lime green interior. It’s now empty and up for lease. (Pictured, from l., facing camera: Jimmy Ida, Matty Ianniello and Josehp Brancaccio.)

 

Mafia Ravenite

RAVENITE — 247 Mulberry St., Manhattan.

On Christmas Eve 1985, days after the murder of Gambino boss Paul Castellano, the FBI watched as 200 members and associates in the Gambino family stopped by to pay homage to the new boss, John Gotti. The FBI later planted a bug in the hallway and in an upstair’s apartment used by Gotti. Today the Ravenite is ‘Shoe,’ a trendy boutique that keeps gangster’s hours, not opening until noon. (Pictured: Anthony ‘The Roach’ Rampino (center) enters the Ravenite.)

 

Tali's Bar

TALI’S BAR — 6205 18th Ave. Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.

A longtime haunt of Gambino underboss Salvatore (Sammy Bull) Gravano. The bar’s owner, Michael DeBatt, was shot in the head by a member of Gravano’s crew and left bleeding on the floor. Today it’s Pho Vietnamese, a newly opened restaurant. The owner makes a point of showing off bullet pock-marks in the exposed brick wall.

 

gal_mafia_bergin_hunt_fish

BERGIN HUNT AND FISH CLUB — 98-04 101st Ave., Ozone Park, Queens.

Another favorite spot of John Gotti and later his son, John A. (Junior) Gotti. Today it’s divided into two businesses: PSC Medical Supplies and The Dog ‘n Cat House Grooming Salon. (Pictured: Peter Gotti holds court outside in 1996).